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20130423
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about under bush have continued under obama, just with a rebranding. >> let me ask this question of emma. i want to reread a statement from the kremlin about the aftermath of boston. the russian and u.s. president have agreed by telephone to increase cooperation on counterterrorism following the boston marathon bombings. the kremlin said on saturday both sides underline their interest 234 deepening the close cooperation of the russian and u.s. special services in the fight against international terrorism, but gave no details. i think one of the reasons i wanted to have you here and jeremy here and the congressman is that what we have seen over the last four or five years is an expansion of the battlefield. and in the wake of the fact we're dealing with it appears suspects who are ethnically chechen, one was in dagestan, what would it look like for the u.s. and russia to cooperate more closely, and is that a bad idea, emma? >> well, i think that probably has been happening for quite a while now. but i think shared intelligence sources is a good idea generally, actually. but, you know, the
president bush did. that's what president obama did and this fellow is an american citizen. it's far from clear that there's any law that would allow him to be tried as an enemy combatant. this is a procedure we know works. people get tried in criminal courts every day. the combatant laws we don't know that one can be successfully conducted. that's lost in a mar ras in guantanamo bay. this case will take a long time, be expensive and complicated but he's going to trial and there's going to be a verdict. we know that. >> jeff, thank you very much. fran, julia, as well. appreciate it. follow me on twitte twitter @andersoncooper. what do you think? should he be charged in a criminal court opposed to an enemy combatant? >>> and we will dig in to the case. the older suspect spent last year in parts of dagestan and chechnya. and the older suspect's widow. what we know about her and their relationship and more importantly what the fbi wants to know from her tonight. >>> later, my interview was remarkable woman. i hope you stick around for this. she a dance instructor whose body was broken. she h
't happen in the bush administration, didn't happen in the obama administration, so that was never -- that's just not -- it's irrelevant at this point. now the case is under way. the fact that he was well enough to be arraigned on the complaint means now that the government will move to present this case in the grand jury, probably within a month there will be an indictment, and then the case will move to a federal district court. at that point, i expect things will slow down quite a bit. i would be surprised, given the magnitude and complexity of this case, that there could be a trial inside of a year, but at least now the process is under way. >> juliette, from a law enforcement standpoint, do you think it was the right decision to try him in civilian court? >> absolutely. like what jeff said, there is just really no debate about this. it's more of a political debate. for one, the law doesn't even cover him because he's a u.s. citizen. but from a law enforcement national security perspective, what better way to minimize the impact of terrorists than to treat them like criminals. that's w
that this administration did early on, and the obama administrations continued a lot of the national security policies in the bush administration, to be clear. but they did establish this high value interrogation target group where we've got high value interrogation subjects, and they have a team that they keep very secret and under wraps that they sort of fly in to do, conduct the most important interrogations. and we have been told that they will be leading the interrogation of the boston suspect. how will that team approach interrogating this young man? >> i think they will do it like any fbi agent or any law enforcement individual will do it. these individuals are trained to collect intelligence from detainees. but also on the same time now we have a suspect who already was read his miranda rights. he already have a lawyer present. and i don't think that should affect any trained interrogator, any trained interviewer in doing their job. we have been doing this for many, many years. we did it against terrorist suspects, organized crimes, people who are charged with treason, spies, and it always wor
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4